Jesus

Matthew

The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham. (Matthew:1:1)

And Jacob begat Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus, who is called Christ. (Matthew:1:16)

Mark

The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God; (Mark:1:1)

And it came to pass in those days, that Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee, and was baptized of John in Jordan. (Mark:1:9)

Luke

And, behold, thou shalt conceive in thy womb, and bring forth a son, and shalt call his name JESUS. (Luke:1:31)

And when eight days were accomplished for the circumcising of the child, his name was called JESUS, which was so named of the angel before he was conceived in the womb. (Luke:2:21)

John

For the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. (John:1:17)

The next day John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith, Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world. (John:1:29)

Above are the first two verses of each of the four Gospels where the name Jesus is mentioned.

In the Gospel of Matthew, it reads:

The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham. (Matthew:1:1)

And Jacob begat Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus, who is called Christ. (Matthew:1:16)

It starts, “The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham.” What does that mean?

Let’s see. The word generation is found in the Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible. It means nativity; figuratively nature: – generation nature (-ral).

Nativity – the occasion of a person’s birth.

Help me out here, is the author of the Gospel of Matthew saying that what is being written is the book of the “Occasion of the birth” of Jesus Christ and Jesus Christ is the son of David and the son of Abraham?

Or

Is the author of the Gospel of Matthew saying that what is being written is the book of the “Nature” of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham?

My guess, it’s meant to plant the idea in the mind of the reader and listener from the very start that the character Jesus Christ is of Jewish descent.

After a very misleading first mentioning, the author of the Gospel of Matthew lists names until:

And Jacob begat Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus, who is called Christ. (Matthew:1:16)

Well, I’m glad the author of the Gospel of Matthew cleared that up!

In the Gospel of Matthew chapter one verse one, the author is writing about someone named Jesus Christ, not the person that Jacob begat whose name was Joseph, the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus, who is called Christ.

The name Jesus is of Hebrew origin found in the Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible under the reference number H3091.

Jesus (that is Jehoshua) the name of our Lord and two (three) other Israelites.

H3081 – From H3068 and H3467; Jehovah-saved.

H3068 -; (the) self Existent or eternal; {Jehovah} Jewish national name of God: – {Jehovah} the Lord.

H3467 – properly to be {open} wide or {free} that {is} (by implication) to be safe; causatively to free or succor: – X at {all} {avenging} {defend} deliver ({-er}) {help} {preserve} {rescue} be {safe} bring (having) {salvation} save ({-iour}) get victory.

The name Jesus means; Jehovah-saved, notSalvation” like most preachers, “Fathers” and teachers of the bible would have you believe.

The word “Christ” is found in the Strong’s Concordance it means; anointed that is the Messiah an epithet of Jesus.

It’s from reference number G5548 which means; to smear or rub with oil that is (by implication) to consecrate to an office or religious service: – anoint.

Epithet – an adjective or descriptive phrase expressing a quality characteristic of the person or thing mentioned.

The phrase, “That is the Messiah” written after, “Anointed” in the definition of the word “Christ” sends up a “Red flag” in my mind, body and soul…

The word Messiah means; anointed. The word Christ means; anointed.

The word Messiah is used twice in the entire bible. The word Christ is used five hundred and fifty-five times in the New Testament.

The word Messiah is capitalized for no apparent reason in both of the only two cases where it appears to be referring to a “Prince.”

Know therefore and understand, that from the going forth of the commandment to restore and to build Jerusalem unto the Messiah the Prince shall be seven weeks, and threescore and two weeks: the street shall be built again, and the wall, even in troublous times. (Daniel:9:25)

And after threescore and two weeks shall Messiah be cut off, but not for himself: and the people of the prince that shall come shall destroy the city and the sanctuary; and the end thereof shall be with a flood, and unto the end of the war desolations are determined. (Daniel:9:26)

The reason this fact sends up a “Red flag” in my mind, body and soul is because the authors of the four Gospels took the Hebrew word “Messiah,” which only appears in the entire bible twice, which means; anointed and translated it into Greek; Christ, which also means; anointed, then made it into the last name of Jesus!

That’s just not right…

In the Gospel of Mark, the first two verses that mention the name Jesus reads:

The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God; (Mark:1:1)

And it came to pass in those days, that Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee, and was baptized of John in Jordan. (Mark:1:9)

The author of the Gospel of Matthew called what was being written about this “Jesus Christ” a book.

Book – Properly the inner bark of the papyrus plant that is (by implication) a sheet or scroll of writing.

The author of the Gospel of Mark called what was being written about this “Jesus Christ’ a “Gospel.” The definition in the Strong’s Concordance is:

Gospel – From the same as G2097; a good message that is the gospel:

G2097 – to announce good news (evangelize) especially the gospel: – declare bring (declare show) glad (good) tidings preach (the gospel).

The definition found in a Google search from an English dictionary is:

The teaching or revelation of Christ; the record of Jesus’ life and teaching in the first four books of the New Testament.

So, which is it, a “Book” or a “Gospel;” a good message or to announce good news; the teaching or revelation of Christ or the record of Jesus’ life and teaching in the first four books of the New Testament?

Regardless of what it is, the author of the Gospel of Mark writes in chapter one verse one:

The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God; (Mark:1:1)

The author of the Gospel of Mark also called Jesus, “Jesus Christ.” What’s up with that?!

The author goes on to write, the Son of God. Notice that the word “Son” is capitalized, for no apparent reason.

It’s not the first word of a sentence. It’s not a proper noun. So why is the word son capitalized?

The next time the name Jesus is mentioned in the Gospel of Mark is:

And it came to pass in those days, that Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee, and was baptized of John in Jordan. (Mark:1:9)

Again, the character “Jesus Christ” turns back into just Jesus. It’s amazing how that happens.

Anyway, in those days, Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee, and was baptized of John in Jordan.

By now, I hope it’s obvious that every definition is from the Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible, unless I say otherwise.

Nazareth – Of uncertain derivation; Nazareth or Nazaret a place in Palestine.

Galilee – Of Hebrew origin [H1551]; Galilaea (that is the heathen circle) a region of Palestine.

H1551 – a circle (with the article); Galil (as a special circuit) in the North of Palestine: – Galilee.

Baptized – to make whelmed (that is fully wet); used only (in the New Testament) of ceremonial ablution especially (technically) of the ordinance of Christian baptism: – baptist baptize wash.

John – Of Hebrew origin [H3110]; Joannes (that is Jochanan) the name of four Israelites.

H3110 – A form of H3076; {Jochanan} the name of nine Israelites: – Johanan.

H3076 – From H3068 and H2603; Jehovah-favored; {Jehochanan} the name of eight Israelites: – {Jehohanan} Johanan.

H3068 – (the) self Existent or eternal; {Jehovah} Jewish national name of God: – {Jehovah} the Lord

H2603 – A primitive root; properly to bend or stoop in kindness to an inferior; to {favor} bestow; causatively to implore (that {is} move to favor by petition): – {beseech} X {fair} ({be} {find} shew) favour ({-able}) be ({deal} {give} grant (gracious ({-ly}) {intreat} (be) {merciful} have (shew) mercy ({on} {upon}) have pity {upon} {pray} make {supplication} X very.

Jordan – Of Hebrew origin [H3383]; the Jordanes (that is Jarden) a river of Palestine.

H3383 – a descender; {Jarden} the principal river of Palestine.

The word descender is not found in the Strong’s Concordance, but I was able to find it with a Google search. Initially, the Google search only talked about letters like a small g and a small p; the parts of the letters that extended below the line when written on lined paper.

Eventually, I found:

Descender – someone who descends.

Descends – move or fall downward.

The first two times the name Jesus is mentioned in the Gospel of Luke reads:

And, behold, thou shalt conceive in thy womb, and bring forth a son, and shalt call his name JESUS. (Luke:1:31)

And when eight days were accomplished for the circumcising of the child, his name was called JESUS, which was so named of the angel before he was conceived in the womb. (Luke:2:21)

The very first thing one notices is that the name Jesus is written in all capital letters. What’s up with that?!

My guess? It’s because the author of the Gospel of Luke wants to emphasize the fact that an “Angel” is saying the name JESUS.

That’s quite obvious, because the second time the name Jesus is mentioned in the Gospel of Luke that’s exactly what the author writes:

And when eight days were accomplished for the circumcising of the child, his name was called JESUS, which was so named of the angel before he was conceived in the womb. (Luke:2:21)

Notice, the word son in the Gospel of Luke chapter one verse thirty-one is not capitalized.

The author of the Gospel of Luke went, “Out of the way” to make sure, “Beyond a shadow of a doubt,” that the reader and the listener were aware that the birth of Jesus was a “Perfectly” human birth; complete with a ceremonious circumcision, but foretold by an ANGEL…

Last, but not least, the Gospel of John. The first two times the name Jesus is mentioned the author writes:

For the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. (John:1:17)

The next day John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith, Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world. (John:1:29)

Again, with calling Jesus, “Jesus Christ!” Jesus Christ! Once and for all, Jesus’ last name is not Christ!

For the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. (John:1:17)

Law – From a primary word νέμω nemō (to parcel out especially food or grazing to animals); law (through the idea of prescriptive usage) generally (regulation) specifically (of Moses [including the volume]; also, of the Gospel) or figuratively (a principle).

Moses – Of Hebrew origin [H4872]; drawing out (of the {water}) that {is} rescued.

Grace – graciousness (as gratifying) of manner or act (abstract or concrete; literal figurative or spiritual; especially the divine influence upon the heart and its reflection in the life; including gratitude): – acceptable benefit favour gift grace (-ious) joy liberality pleasure thank (-s -worthy).

Truth – From G227; truth: – true X truly truth verity.

G227 – true (as not concealing): – true truly truth.

Jesus – Of Hebrew origin [H3091]; Jehovah-saved.

Christ – through the idea of contact; to smear or rub with oil that is (by implication) to consecrate to an office or religious service; anointed.

The next day John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith, Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world. (John:1:29)

The second time the name Jesus is mentioned in the Gospel of John, the John being written about is the same John who baptized Jesus in the Gospel of Mark chapter one verse nine.

Notice, the word lamb is capitalized for no apparent reason, just like the word son is capitalized for no apparent reason in the Gospel of Mark chapter one verse one. What’s up with that?

Anyway, the next day John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith, Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.

I’m guessing, at least in the case of the word lamb, that the reason the word lamb is capitalized for no apparent reason is to emphasize that the, “Lamb of God” taketh away the sin of the world, not Jesus, “Taketh away the sin of the world,” which many teachers, fathers and preachers of the “Word of God” would have you believe.

Lamb – a lamb.

God – a deity especially (with G3588) the supreme Divinity; figuratively a magistrate; by Hebraism very: – X exceeding God god [-ly -ward].

Sin – properly to miss the mark (and so not share in the prize) that is (figuratively) to err especially (morally) to sin: – for your faults offend sin trespass; sin (properly abstract): – offence sin (-ful).

World – (to tend that is take care of); properly to provide for that is (by implication) to carry off (as if from harm; generally obtain): – bring receive; orderly arrangement that is decoration; by implication the world (in a wide or narrow sense including its inhabitants literally or figuratively [morally]): – adorning world.

Did You Know?

According to modern day scholars, as well as a Google search, (Bible.org; April 16th 2008) “Ancient scribes who copied the handwritten texts of the New Testament frequently changed the text intentionally.

Although unintentional changes account for the vast majority of textual corruption, intentional alterations also account for thousands of corruptions. In some cases, to be sure, it does seem that the scribes were being malicious.”

The above statement is not a recent discovery. Scholars have known about deliberate alterations to the New Testament of the Holy Bible for decades.

Although it “Cracks me up” to think about all the people I’ve witnessed get caught up in the “Holy Spirit;” shouting; speaking in tongues and praising the name of “Jesus Christ,” it’s not funny that these people, after hearing the “Word of God” preached by some human being, had such a reaction to what amounts to “Something a scribe wrote…”

While I believe with all my heart, and with all my soul, and with all my might that the Holy Bible is inspired by God, I cannot ignore the fact that the scriptures have been “Corrupted.”

Bart D. Ehrman, an American New Testament scholar focusing on textual criticism of the New Testament, the historical Jesus and the origins and development of early Christianity, has written and edited 30 books, including three college textbooks, six New York Times bestsellers and is currently the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies at the Hill says, “One of the most amazing and perplexing features of mainstream Christianity is that seminarians who learn the historical-critical method in their Bible classes appear to forget all about it when it comes time for them to be pastors.

They are taught critical approaches to Scripture, they learn about the discrepancies and contradictions, they discover all sorts of historical errors and mistakes, they come to realize that it is difficult to know whether Moses existed or what Jesus actually said and did, they find that there are other books that were at one time considered canonical but that ultimately did not become part of Scripture (for example, other Gospels and Apocalypses), they come to recognize that a good number of the books of the Bible are pseudonymous (for example, written in the name of an apostle by someone else), that in fact we don’t have the original copies of any of the biblical books but only copies made centuries later, all of which have been altered. They learn all of this, and yet when they enter church ministry, they appear to put it back on the shelf. Pastors are, as a rule, reluctant to teach what they learned about the Bible in seminary.”

While I certainly agree with Bart D. Ehrman on most of what he writes in his books, we part ways when it comes to “Textual Criticism.”

Textual criticism, the process of attempting to ascertain the original wording of a text can only go so far.

According to Wikipedia, “The objective of the textual critic’s work is to provide a better understanding of the creation and historical transmission of the text and its variants. This understanding may lead to the production of a “critical edition” containing a scholarly curated text. If a scholar has several versions of a manuscript but no known original, then established methods of textual criticism can be used to seek to reconstruct the original text as closely as possible. The same methods can be used to reconstruct intermediate versions, or recensions, of a document’s transcription history, depending on the number and quality of the text available.”

I have a problem with the phrase, “As closely as possible.”

God inspired the Holy Bible. There is no amount of man’s “Meddling” that can take away from that!

Scribes may have changed the words, Christians may have added and subtracted verses and stories, but two things have remained constant throughout the centuries, the names of the characters and the meanings of the pertinent Hebrew and Greek words.

With that in mind, let’s continue analyzing the first two verses of each of the four Gospels where the name Jesus is mentioned:

Before we continue, it’s important to correct a few things. The Gospel of Mark was the first Gospel written.

It is believed by most scholars that the authors of the Gospels of Matthew and Luke used the Gospel of Mark as a source, that’s why most of the stories in the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke are the same.

They’re called the synoptic Gospels because they include many of the same stories, often in the same sequence, and similar wording.

This degree of parallelism in content, narrative arrangement, language, and sentence structures can only be accounted for by literary interdependence.

The Gospel of John was written long after the synoptic Gospels. It is quite different with hardly any of the same stories.

Mark

The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God; (Mark:1:1)

And it came to pass in those days, that Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee, and was baptized of John in Jordan. (Mark:1:9)

Matthew

The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham. (Matthew:1:1)

And Jacob begat Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus, who is called Christ. (Matthew:1:16)

Luke

And, behold, thou shalt conceive in thy womb, and bring forth a son, and shalt call his name JESUS. (Luke:1:31)

And when eight days were accomplished for the circumcising of the child, his name was called JESUS, which was so named of the angel before he was conceived in the womb. (Luke:2:21)

John

For the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ. (John:1:17)

The next day John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith, Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world. (John:1:29)

Now that the Gospels are in the correct order, let’s examine the scriptures using the “Pertinent Words and Names Method.”

Notice, three out of four of the authors of the Gospels introduce a character called “Jesus Christ.”

The author of the Gospel of Luke only alludes to the character “Jesus Christ” by putting the name Jesus in all capital letters. (JESUS)

Two of the authors of the Gospels introduce a man named Jesus and two of the authors introduce a child named Jesus.

The character “Jesus Christ” is said to be the “Son” of God in the Gospel of Mark. The word son being spelled with a capital (s) for no apparent reason.

In the Gospel of Matthew, the character “Jesus Christ” is said to be the son of David, the son of Abraham. The word son being spelled with a small (s).

According to the author of the Gospel of Luke, an angel foretells the birth of a male child whose name was called Jesus. Jesus being spelled with all capital letters for no apparent reason. (JESUS)

The author of the Gospel of John declared:

For the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by the character “Jesus Christ.”

The author of the Gospel of John called the man Jesus, “Lamb of God.” Lamb being spelled with a capital (L) for no apparent reason.

Let’s use the “Pertinent Words and Names Method” to interpret the Holy Scriptures. Starting with the character “Jesus Christ.”

Jesus is defined as “Jehovah-saved” and Christ is defined as “Anointed” or the Greek translation, “Messiah.”

I believe, in His infinite “Wisdom,” God hid His “Word” in plain sight.

We are only analyzing the first two verses of each of the four Gospels where the name Jesus is mentioned, but if you apply this method to the rest of the bible verses you will be amazed at its consistency!

The phrase, “Jehovah-saved” which is the meaning of the word Jesus in Hebrew, can be understood in two ways.

First it could be understood as, “Jehovah saved Jesus,” as in Jehovah raised Jesus from the dead.

Or

It could be understood as, “Jehovah, saved” as in Jehovah was saved from dying by God.

Using the “Pertinent Words and Names Method,” the word “Christ” means; anointed; or “Christ” could be a “Messiah;” a “Prince or King.”

Remember earlier, when I said, “Christ” is not Jesus’s last name? My reason is made clearer here.

When translated to its original language, Hebrew, the phrase “Jesus Christ” would mean; Jehovah-saved anointed.

It just doesn’t make sense…

One could argue that in the Gospel of Mark chapter one verse one, where the author wrote, “The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God” could be translated, “The beginning of the gospel of Jehovah (was) saved; Messiah, the Son of God.”

I believe that would be a “Stretch.”

Or would it?

One thing I can say with confidence is, as far as the four Gospels are concerned, they are referring to two different entities!

One, the character “Jesus Christ” and the other a human being (man) named Jesus.

The character “Jesus Christ” is said to be, “The Son of God; son of David, the son of Abraham. They shalt call his name JESUS; his name was called JESUS and grace and truth came by “Jesus Christ.”

The man Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee, and was baptized of John in Jordan; Jacob begat Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus, who is called Christ; John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith, Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.

Lamb being spelled with a capital (L) for no apparent reason.

The author of the Gospel of Mark wrote that Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee.

The word Nazareth is defined as a place in Palestine.

The word Galilee is defined as Galilaea (that is the heathen circle) a region of Palestine.

If Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee, according to the “Pertinent Words and Names Method” of analyzing the scriptures, Jesus was a “Nazarene” from the “Heathen Circle.”

A Nazarene from the heathen circle is a “Heathen.”

Jesus was a “Heathen!”

That explains why the authors of the Gospels of Matthew and Luke, who used what the author of the Gospel of Mark wrote as their source, changed the “Narrative.”

They added “Birth” narratives to each of their stories.

The problem is the birth narrative in the Gospel of Matthew is completely different from the birth narrative in the Gospel of Luke.

The author of the Gospel of Matthew or a scribe, whichever you want to believe added the birth narrative, had Jacob begat Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus, who is called Christ.

The author of the Gospel of Luke wrote, “When eight days were accomplished for the circumcising of the child, his name was called JESUS, which was so named of the angel before he was conceived in the womb.”

Because we’re only analyzing the first two verses of each of the four Gospels where the name Jesus is mentioned the difference in birth narratives are not that obvious, but you can compare them for yourself.

Jesus being a “Heathen” would also answers the question, “Why did Jesus need to be baptized by John the Baptist for the remission of sins?”

In the Gospel of John, the author contrasts the word or name, “Moses” with the word or name, “Jesus.”

The word “Moses” means; drawing out (of the {water}) that {is} rescued, which verify the statement I made earlier that if you apply this “Pertinent Words and Names Method” to the rest of the bible verses you will be amazed at its consistency!

Let me add, “Moses” was rescued from the water way back in the Old Testament of the Holy Bible in the book of Exodus:

And the child grew, and she brought him unto Pharaoh’s daughter, and he became her son. And she called his name Moses: and she said, Because I drew him out of the water. (Exodus:2:10)

“And she called his name Moses: and she said, Because I drew him out of the water,” could it be said, “She called his name Jesus: Because Jehovah-saved him from death?!”

The fact that the word “Moses” is defined as drawing out (of the {water}) that {is} rescued and that’s exactly what happened in the story in the Old Testament, reminds me to say, the only way to fully understand the New Testament, one has to use the “Pertinent Words and Names Method” to analyze the Old Testament!

The author writes, “The next day John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith, Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.

The word Lamb means; lamb.

The word God in the Greek language means; a deity especially (with G3588) the supreme Divinity; figuratively a magistrate; by Hebraism very: – X exceeding God god [-ly -ward].

G3588 – the this that one he she it etc…

The word God in the Hebrew language means; Plural of H433; gods in the ordinary sense; but specifically used (in the plural {thus} especially with the article) of the supreme God.

H433 – a deity or the deity: – {God} god.

In the New Testament (Greek) the word God is singular.

In the Old Testament (Hebrew) the word God is Plural. Two different entities

Because we’re only analyzing the first two verses of each of the four Gospels where the name Jesus is mentioned, it’s understandable if some of my claims sound unbelievable.

Don’t trip, this is only lesson two!